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typeface

stewf: What is “Reading Edge”? In this Imprint interview, Font...



stewf:

What is “Reading Edge”? In this Imprint interview, Font Bureau’s David Jonathan Ross illustrates the difference between a print typeface and a screen-optimized typeface.



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silentgiantla: Qalto typeface Qalto flows and leaps like...









silentgiantla:

Qalto typeface

Qalto flows and leaps like freestyle jazz. Suited as a strong title or headline font, the letters and ligatures are composed of very thin hairlines and very thick elements. This high contrast conveys a stunning visual effect and a unique optical rhythm. Early on, Aron Jancso realized that “some words have good rhythm and others don’t,” and added stylistic alternatives for every lowercase and uppercase letter. If that’s not enough, there are four different weights, so users can use different sizes with the same hairline thickness, which allows for artistic freedom in arrangement and composition.









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Frontage Typeface Frontage is a charming layered type system...









Frontage Typeface

Frontage is a charming layered type system with endless design possibilities using different combinations of fonts and colors. Achieve a realistic 3D effect by adding the shadow font or just use the capital letters of the regular and bold cut for stark artwork. The typeface’s design is based on a simple grid which creates the friendly, handcrafted look of facade signs. It is generously spaced for maximum impact of your message. As a display typeface Frontage loves color and is suitable for headlines and logotypes. Details include 224 characters in five styles and manually edited kerning.

youworkforthem.com









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Comic Sans. Every designers worst nightmare.  But why do we hate...











Comic Sans. Every designers worst nightmare. 

But why do we hate this font (‘typeface’ for those who will be offended by me calling in a ‘font’) so much when it has brought so much joy to so many people? 

Let me ask you this, dear reader… What would people use when advertising their lost dog? What would schools use to promote what drama play the kiddies are doing? What would that annoying fucking receptionist use to make that sign above the kitchen sink that says ‘Everyone should clean up their own dishes’.
You know what, fuck off asshat. You’re nearly 45, have no life, do jack shit and you have the IQ of a toaster. Let me make a sign for you. YOU DO THEM.

Come on, you know the type. 

Reminiscing, I used good old Comic Sans back in the day to type up my short stories at school. Because it looked friendly and cute. I mean, really… isn’t it harmless? Do people hate poor old CS because it’s just so damn sweet?

Well, there are still some people out there fighting for Comic Sans and to rid the stigma of it being a poor mans typeface. And they’re doing it by asking people like you to recreate famous logos with it. And they haven’t come out too shabby.

Is there still hope for Comic Sans? I’d like to think so after seeing these logo recreations. Perhaps it’s the way Comic Sans is used that will be the thing that saves it.

Love you Comic Sans. Sorry for bullying you.  

Ha. What am I saying? I’m going to see it on the menu in a Cafe and skitz it.

WHY???? FOR THE LOVE OF GOD… WHY?

To see more logos and ‘The Comic Sans Project’ go here: http://comicsansproject.tumblr.com/











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Watching Words Move “First published in 1962, this work of...









Watching Words Move

“First published in 1962, this work of experimental typography uses letters in a single typeface, Helvetica, to achieve surprising results — motion and narrative, emotion and humor.”









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Type designers Fontsmith have published a limited edition of 10...



Type designers Fontsmith have published a limited edition of 10 booklets to commemorate 10 years since their first typeface release.

Each booklet is a short story written by one of the type designers, providing an insight into the creative process of typeface design.

Read more information all about the project here at the fontsmith blog.



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